1971

TO LISTEN TO GEORGE JONE'S 50,000 NAMES ON THE WALL

64 65 66 67 68 69 70   72 73

 

1971

01

22

E-6 SSG

Kenneth 

Lovelace

11F4S

KIA, helicopter crash

SVN; B-53, Instructor, Bien Hoa Prov., same Huey as Celano

1971

01

22

E-5 SGT

Hugh D.

Opperman

11C4S

KIA, helicopter crash

SVN; CCC, trainee at 1-0 school, Bien Hoa Prov., same Huey as Celano

1971

01

22

E-5 SGT

Frank A.

Celano

11B4S

KIA, helicopter crash

SVN; CCC, trainee at 1-0 school, Bien Hoa Prov.; 240 AHC #66-16356; hovering over downed LOH

22 Jan 71- Kenneth Lovelace, SSG E-6. USASF Instructor, Recon Tm Ldrs School, B-53, Long Than, Ops 38; Frank A. Celano, SGT E-5 and Hugh D. Opperman, SGT E-5, USASF, CCC, Kontum, Ops 35,  KIA during a  SOG Reconnaissance Team Leader’s Course  while a on Recon, and William H. Seaborn, Jr., WO1,  240 AHC/222 CAB. They were engaged by an unexpected enemy which overwhelmed them by number. FOR DETAILS SEE-->LOVELACE/CELANO/OPPERMAN/SMITH

Bill SeabornWilliam H. Seaborn, Jr.

A note from The Virtual Wall - 14 Aug 2001

On 22 January 1971, an OH-6A (hull number 68-17337) of D/3/4 CAV 25 INF was shot down. Efforts were immediately instituted to rescue the crew:

bullet

CW2 Rog Johnson, pilot;

bullet

SGT Michael Harris Petty, observer; and

bullet

SP4 Frederick Anthony Vigil, crew chief.

Another helicopter was lost in that effort. According to fellow pilot Hugh ("Sandy") McLeod

"They were in the area training at the time of the crash, and responded to my call for assistance. They were hovering over a hole in the canopy, and with Special Forces folks on rapelling lines, they were shot down." (Feb 1999) 

WO1 William H. Seaborn, Jr., 240 AHC/222 CAB, was piloting the second helicopter, a UH-1D (hull number 66-16356). Three Special Forces troopers, SGT Frank A. Celano, SSG Kenneth Lovelace, and SGT Hugh D. Opperman, were the men rapelling to the ground in an effort to rescue the men in the OH-6A. These four men died when the UH-1 was shot down. The bodies of all seven men - three from the OH-6A, four from the UH-1D - were recovered

1971

01

28

E-5 SGT

Arthur A.

Smith

11C4S

DNH, helicopter crash

SVN; CCN, trainee at 1-0 school, Bien Hoa Prov.

28 Jan 71- Arthur A. Smith, SGT E-5, USASF CCN, Da Nang, Ops 35 killed in helicopter crash (non hostile) Bien Hoa Province,South Vietnam (Trainee at 1-0 school). He is listed by the Virtual Vietnam Wall as being assigned to Co A, 5th SFGA.

29 Jan 71- David Ives Mixter, SGT E-5 of Darien, Conn, USASF, CCC, RT Colorado, Kontum, Ops 35 MIA-Body not recovered. While on a recon mission operating in Laos that made contact with an enemy force. The enemy used B-40 rocket propelled grenades against the team and one exploded directly in front of Mixer. He was checked by a team member, he was covered with blood and did not respond, thought to be dead and was left behind in the effort to break contact with the enemy. Due to heavy enemy activity his remains were left behind. NOTE: Mixer was SOG’s final MIA in Laos.

David L Mixer Fr SF Honor Roll

15 Feb 71- Marvin Maurice Leonard, W02, Pilot of Grand Rapids, Mich; Barry Frank Fivelson, WO-2 of Evanston, Ill; James Harry Taylor, 2LT 0-1 of Oroville, CA; Everett Crone, SP/4 of Whittier, CA; Willis Calvin Crear, SP/4 of Birmingham, CA and John Lynn Powers, SP/4 of Mackay, Idaho, USA Aviation, Co C, 159th Avn Bn, 101ST ABN DIV Ops 32/75,MIA- Presumptive finding of death. On a SOG resupply mission in Laos their helicopter (CH-47C) caught fire and exploded in the air, and crashed in a area replete with enemy activity. There were no indications of survivors.

CroneDE01c.jpgEverett Crone From Vietnam Virtual Wall

1971

02

18

E-5 SGT

Allen R.

Lloyd

05C4S

KIA, BNR, helicopter shotdown

Laos; CCN, RT Intruder, YC481785, 5k S of A-102 A Shau, w/ CPT Watson, 101AVN #68-15255

1971

02

18

O-3 CPT

Ronald L.

Watson

31542

KIA, BNR, helicopter shotdown

Laos; CCN, RT Intruder, YC481785, 5k S of A-102 A Shau, w/ SGT Lloyd; 101AVN #68-15255

18 Feb 71- Ronald "DOC" Leonard Watson, CPT 0-3 of El Paso, TX; Allen "Baby Jesus"Richard Lloyd, SGT E-5 of St Charles, Minn; USASF, CCN, Da Nang; RT Intruder, Ops 35 and George Phillip Berg, WO-1 of Belford, NJ Air Craft Commander; Gregory Stephen Crandall, WO-1; Gerald Ernest Woods, WO- 1, Pilot; Walter Edward Demsey, Jr, SP/4, Crew Chief of Glendora, NJ; Robert Joseph Engen, SP/4 of Stockton, CA; Walter Edward Lewellen, SP/4 of New Albany, IN; Gary Lee Johnson, PFC E-3, Door Gunner of Malibu, A CO, 101ST AVN BN, 101ST AVN GROUP, 101ST ABN DIV, Comanchero 19, UH-1H #68-15255. MIA-Presumptive finding of death. With less than 2 weeks before the end of US-led teams in the A Shau in Laos . Upon insertion the team encountered the enemy and engaged them, killing two and the remainder dispersed. The team worked their way to an LZ and a Huey was making a STABO rig extraction. All 3 Americans hooked up and as the helicopter lifted off, it was hit. A door gunner cut one of the ropes loose and SSG Sammy Hernandez fell 30-45 feet before the helicopter went off a cliff with the other two Americans still on the ropes. The helicopter crashed and exploded Killing these 13 men. " On 19 Feb, a Special Forces recovery team was inserted at the crash site to search the area. Woods and Berg were found dead in their seats. Johnson's body was found in a tree. One leg of Demsey, the burned CE, was found in the cargo compartment. All remains were prepared for extraction, and the team left to establish a night defensive position. Enroute, the team found the remains of Lloyd and Watson, still on their rope slings, in the trees on the edge of a cliff. Because of the rugged terrain and approaching darkness, the rescue team leader decided to wait until morning to recover these two remains. However, the following morning, the search team came under intense fire, and te team leader requested an emergency extraction, and in so doing left all remains behind." by http://www.a101avn.org/KIA~MIA.html. Hernandez was rescued. (See 19 Feb for continued action). Note: See RT Intruder in the "individual memorial" section. {Filed by SSG Don "Sluggo" Murphy: . In January of 72 I was the covey rider at Phu Bai and Bob Woodham our chase medic asked me if I would look on the ridge in the South end of the Ashau for a ladder that was in the treetops. I did and it was still there. He was involved in the brightlight operation for Watson and Lloyd. He said he had put both bodies in bags there. The lines were still hooked to them and let to where the aircraft was crashed. He asked if I would check with MACSOG and mount a recovery mission for those two and the aircrew still in the crash site. I did but the request was denied.} [Doc (the Brain) Watson came to the front gate of CCN one day and asked for an interview. He was or had been in the Phoenix Program. He had a PHD from Stanford. I asked him why he wanted to be a 10. He said it was to help him understand human psychology," why would a person want to lead in such a program." We accepted him and sent him to 10 down at Long Thanh. He also told me that he was an orphan..-BG George Gaspard]  VISIT The Missing Men of RT Intruter
SPECIAL NOTE TO DEMPSEY: DON MURPHY WHO FILED THE NEW INFO THAT HE WENT TO THE AREA OF THE CRASH IN JAN 72 AND THE LADDER WHICH THE ORIGINAL TEAM HAD LEFT WAS STILL THERE, CAN BE CONTACTED BY CALLIN HIM FOR MORE DETAILED INFO BEFORE YOU GUYS GO BACK FOR THE RECOVERY MISSION. HE CAN BE CONTACTED VIA EMAIL AT dasmurf@commandnet.net OR TELEPHONE 270-798-3581.

Walter E DemseyWalter E Demsey, Jr. From Vietnam Virtual Wall

Gary Lee Johnson, PFC. from Task Force Omega, Inc.

 

Visit: A dedication page

 

 

The Special Forces team was on an information gathering mission on the Ho Chi Minh trail. The team was monitoring the trail when an enemy soldier was spotted riding a bike, carrying documents. Shots were fired, the soldier was killed, and the documents were recovered.

The shots alerted the enemy in the area and a fire fight broke out. The team called for an emergency extraction. Four choppers were sent in and all four made a pickup and returned safely to Phu Bai. Three Special Forces team members still remained to be picked up, my brother's crew elected to return to make the final pickup. Daylight was beginning to fade and the weather in the pickup zone was closing in. The chopper proceeded down the ridgeline of the west wall of the Ashau Valley in the clouds moving to the west to the pickup site just inside of Laos. The three remaining Special Forces personnel (Ronald Watson, Allen Lloyd, and Sam Hernandez) were picked up with the enemy firing at the chopper the whole time. The chopper headed to the east towards the Ashau at tree top level dragging the Special Forces team who were on ropes thru the trees. The chopper crossed over the west wall ridgeline and Sam Hernandez' rope broke dropping him 40 ft to the jungle floor, the chopper continued to head east into the Ashau Valley for 600 ft when the chopper made a "U" turn crashing into the west wall and bursting into a ball of flames. Sam survived the fall and was shaken up but was not injured, he didn't see or hear the chopper go down and started an E&E for the night.

The 1971 Recovery Attempt

On Feb. 19, 1971 a Special Forces team was inserted close to the crash site in an attempt to rescue or recover any crew members. The team spotted Sam Hernandez on the ground and picked him up. Sam had the documents that were captured the day before with him. Sam was flow back to base. The team located the crash site 600 ft down from the top of the ridgeline, the chopper had been almost totally destroyed. Berg and Woods were found still strapped in their seats, Johnson was found in a tree 30 ft from the site, and Demsey's leg was found very close to the cargo compartment. It is believed that Demsey was thrown from the chopper when it crashed and it rolled over on him cutting the leg off and trapping the rest of his body under the wreckage.

The team placed the remains into bodybags on top of the wreckage. The weather was closing in, the daylight was fading, and the decision was made to leave the remains at the crash site and to stay over night near the crash site. The team headed Northwest on the top of the ridgeline and passed a cliff, the ropes were spotted hanging over the cliff with Watson and Lloyd still attached to their ropes at the bottom. The team continued heading Northwest for hill 1528 where they spent the night. The following morning the team was preparing to return to the crash site when they were attacked. The team suffered two wounded and a Covey pilot Larry Hull crashed and was killed, the team was extracted without the remains and the decision was made not to return because the area was so hot. Some of the team members on that mission were Charles Westley, Cliff Newman, and Charles Danzer, all with the 5th Special Forces Group out of Danang.

 

1971

02

19

E-7 SFC

William M.

Fernandez

11F4S

KIA, fixed wing shotdown

Laos; CCN, Covey Rider, trying to recover RT Intruder; aboard O-2A #68-11001, 55 mi West of Da Nang

19 Feb 71- James "Woodstock" Larry Hull, 2LT 0-1 of Lubbock, TX USAF, FAC Pilot, 20TH TAC AIR SPT SQDN, 504TH TAC AIR SPT GROUP OPS 32/75 and William "Jose" M. Fernandez, SFC E-7, USASF FAC Covey Rider, TF1AE- Da Nang (CCN), LT Hull last seen providing air support for a SOG recon team listed as MIA; SFC Fernandez KIA-RR. (Added by Fred Wunderlitch, "Lightning": This mission was a continuation of the action from 18 Feb and before. My team did the bright light on the 0-2 crash site. We were able to pull Jose out, but Woodstock was pinned between the engine and seat. "Your text is a little unclear if it implies that Hull might be MIA, but there is no doubt in my mind that he was KIA). "As always the devil is in the detail and the passage of time has dimmed but certainly not erased the memory of what was a rather hectic period. Frankly, everything went to shit that week on nearly all the operations. I saw Sammy go out with Doc and Lloyd, and Cliff come up when things got tough on that one while other missions were also in trouble. We all suited up as brightlight (rescue/reaction) teams. We were listening to the radios, always an agonizing trial where you feel beyond doing anything about it, and heard of the chopper and then later the covey crash. I was to go after the covey aircraft and picked only three others from my team; my 11 (assistant team leader in SOG jargon) Kloecki, who's status I do not know, and two of our local commandos (SCU). Knowing the terrain I planned to rappel in and we did so from a Huey to a thick forest of tall saplings on the hillside just in Lao. It seemed that the O-2 had gone in as a flat spin and cleared a hole down to the ground. The whole top and wing section was shredded down, exposing the cockpit. There were firefights going on in the East, seemingly about a kilometer away, and a lot of aircraft activity in the area. Both Jose and Woodstock were dead and the crash had broken nearly every bone in their bodies. I literally rolled up poor Jose's legs stuffing him into the body bag. Woodstock was wedged tight in the wreckage, especially as the custom was for the pilot to sit well forward. The O-2 gun sight had taken the top of his head off and he was crushed in the seat between the engine shoving back and the rear fuselage. We could not get him out. An HH-53 was sent to get us. One of my SCU started firing from the perimeter around the wreck site but we could not see the bad guys. The HH-53 Parajumper even came down to look with us at the wreck but there was no way to get Woodstock out and there was still a lot of action in the area. We were all hoisted up, along with Jose's body. Onboard, I asked the crew chief if we were going over the hill to get the other team, but he said there was another chopper. It turned out that there wasn't but, like I said, it was a less than agreeable day in a week of unpleasantness. I went back to Lao in 91/92 as part of an oil exploration seismic operation for explosive ordnance clearing... We were in the A/O (Area of Operations) as we used to call it, but I was never quite close enough to this particular area to try and check it out. As I've said, I believe that the general action for the RT Intruder brightlight was about a kilometer East of the covey crash site. Being fairly mountainous territory, I gather that the chopper healed over down the ridge and could be even further from the extraction site." (Frederick Wunderlich, Dec 99)  VISIT The Missing Men of RT Intruter

HullJL01c.jpgJames Hull

Added:  "I was a young E-5 and he an E-7 on his second tour) to me and probably my best friend during my tour in RVN from the time we left Nha Trang together for CCN. He was a covey rider with CCN not CCC. We shared a room at the Phu Bai launch site and it was my sad duty to gather his personal effects for return to his family." (Michael Heinricy)

      ADDED: Sgt Tomas Thompson was the individual who retried "Jose" Fernandez's body while Lt Wunderlich and the other team members provided cover.  Sgt Thompson was unable to get Woodstock's body out of the wreckage [Thomas Thompson] “In Col. Tom Yarborough's book, ‘DANANG DIARY’, he (Yarborough), and another Covey pilot at that time, took out Larry's downed O-2 with him still in it with willie pete to keep the NVA on site from getting Larry's remains.  The crew, Berg, Woods, Demsey and JOHNSON was my crew. I got a 9 day drop and they were lost on the 9th day after I DEROS’ed... Dave Demsey and I went back in June of 92, worked with the JRT, and found nothing. JOHNSON took my place as gunner. [R. Wayne Jones] ADDED:  From the Friday, Oct. 13, 2006 HOUSTON CHRONICLE dateline Lubbock" From staff and wire reports":

"The remains of an airman killed during a mission near the Laos-Vietnam border 35 years ago will be returned  to his family, the military announced Thursday. U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. James L. Hull, of Lubbock, and another crew member were flying an 0-2A Skymaster when they crashed Feb. 19, 1971. Both men died. Hostile enemy action prevented the recovery of Hull's body, so he remained with the wreckage just inside Laos, according to theDepartment of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office. Teams from the U.S. Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command led several investigations to retrieve Hull's  remains between 1993 and 1997. But it wasn't until May 2006 that a joint U.S. and Laotian team excavated a  crash site and recovered human remains that proved to be Hull's. He will be buried with full military honors Nov. 13 at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C."

"I was on the ground with RT intruder when I understood that a covey went down with Jose Fernandez. Yes it became a big mess and a lot more other SOG soldiers got hurt during that same time. Billy Waugh and Cliff Newman with the bright light team he took in ran into a lot of bad guys when they got in. Billy Waugh got me out the next day. I am glad he was flying that day because he recognized me and new the type of uniform I was wearing on that operation. I give him credit for saving my life or I will still be running in the jungles in Laos."
Strength and Honor Sammy (Hernandez, US Army Special Forces, Command and Control North)

Pilot Shot Down Over Laos to Be Buried - Sunday, November 12, 2006

By DON BABWIN, Associated Press Writer

RIVER FOREST, Ill. — Larry Hull knew exactly what he wanted. His dad was an Air Force master sergeant who worked on planes. And from the time Larry was a boy, he wanted to join the Air Force, like his dad. But Hull wanted to fly."Flying and flying in the Air Force went together for him, "said Tyra Manning, who married Hull in the spring of 1966, while the two were students at Texas Tech University. As soon as he finished school in 1968, Hull enlisted in the Air Force and began flying. He'd come home and say, 'You should have seen the clouds today, '"Manning recalled. Hull understood he'd wind up in Vietnam. In the summer of 1970, he went to war.Again, facing the dangers of combat, he made clear what he wanted. He told his wife he wished to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.This Veterans Day weekend, that request will finally be granted, 35 years after he was shot down in Laos, where his body remained with the scorched wreckage of his plane until this year. A memorial service at Arlington on Monday will mark the end of a long journey for Manning and daughter Laura Hull. Larry Hull's fellow soldiers will be there, too, finally able to say goodbye to their fallen comrade. For one of those men, the service also is a chance to put away feelings that he somehow failed his friend when he couldn't bring his body home.___Manning knew her husband was flying over the Ho Chi Minh Trail and that the flights involved reconnaissance. What she didn't know was that he'd volunteered for the highly classified "Prairie Fire" unit, where he commanded the planes and helicopters that dropped Special Forces teams behind enemy lines and pulled fighters from the jungle to safety. Unlike some other reconnaissance flights that typically flew no lower than 1,500 feet, these pilots flew as low as 50 feet, sometimes so low that tree limbs scraped the bellies of their planes. "We had to find these guys in the jungle and we had to get right at the tree tops, "said Tom Yarborough, a retired Air Force colonel who trained Hull and flew with him until the day he died. On Feb. 19, 1971, Hull's unit was searching for the crew of an American helicopter that had been shot down. Yarborough had been flying above the soldiers who were on the ground fighting their way toward the wreckage, and in the afternoon it was Hull's turn. "There was a heavy machine gun up on the slope; it had fired a couple of times, "said Yarborough, who now works in Arlington, Va." I told Larry about that gun, said, 'He's up there and he's firing.' That was the gun that shot him down." The 25-year-old pilot died instantly, his body trapped behind the engine of his plane. A sergeant with him also died. When a recovery team arrived at the scene, they were able to pull the body of the other man from the wreckage, Yarborough recalled. But with the enemy closing in and Hull's body pinned inside the cockpit, there was only time to grab one of Hull's dog tags and leave. Flying over the site a few days later, Yarborough spotted enemy soldiers at the crash site. He could only imagine they were taking his friend's belongings. Angered, he led another attempt to recover Hull's body. But when he shot a smoke rocket to mark the site for other members of the team, he accidentally struck the plane. It burst into flames. With that, Yarborough had to do something unthinkable _ leave his comrade's body behind. "It's such an unwritten covenant among all of us that you would never go off and leave one of your buddies, either wounded or killed, if you could help it, "Yarborough said.___ Manning never knew the details of her husband's death. In fact, because the unit was so secret and much of the information about it remained classified long after the war ended, she never talked to or even knew about any of its members. "I communicated solely with representatives of the military and I did that regularly, "she said. There wasn't time to dwell on it. She had to raise a daughter who was not yet 2, go on with her education and find a job. "I was pretty focused, "she said. She moved from Texas to Kansas to finish school and begin her teaching career. There was a brief, second marriage. She later moved to Illinois, where she spent 12 years as superintendent of an elementary school district in the Chicago suburb of River Forest. In 1993, the Air Force called her with news that farmers just inside Laos, along the Vietnam border, had found some human bones and Hull's other dog tag. Tests using a DNA sample given by Hull's mother confirmed the identification. With the news, Manning contacted the man who had packed Hull's belongings and sent them to her 22 years earlier. "He said, 'I have the name of someone you should really talk to, '"she recalled. It was Yarborough. Yarborough knew Hull had a wife and daughter, but never could bring himself to contact them. "Because of the burning of that airplane, I had my own demons I was dealing with," he said. But he had written a book, "Da Nang Diary, "an account of his days with "Prairie Fire" that included the story of Hull's death. When he finally talked to Manning, he asked her to read the book before the two discussed her dead husband. "He told me that I might not ever want to speak to him after I read the book," said Manning. Manning, though, was comforted by the stories about how comrades teased her husband, named him Woodstock after the "Peanuts" comic strip character and put Woodstock decals on his helmet. And she was eager for the opportunity to visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. with her daughter and Yarborough. Meanwhile, Hull's remains stayed in Laos. After years of negotiations with the Laotian government, U.S. officials were allowed to go to the site in May and recover what they could. On Monday, the journey ends. "I'm not sure if I like the word 'closure. 'Laura and I have gone on with our lives, "Manning said. "But this is a kind of peace, of having the opportunity to have Larry's remains come home and to have it finished." And Yarborough hopes he can put to rest his guilt. "It ate at me, it still does," he said. "That's why I want to get him home and get him a hero's funeral, so that I can get rid of that myself."  Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

1971

04

10

E-5 SGT

Robert N.

Fiesler

11C4S

KIA

SVN; TF2AE, RT Arizona, Kontum Prov.; killed at the Dak To Launch Site by mortar round

10 Apr 71- Robert N. Fiesler, SGT E-5, USASF, TF2AE (CCC), Recon Mission-KIA.  He was killed at Dak To launch site by a rocket attack filed by William F. Lewis

 

1971

04

20

E-5 SGT

Kevin D.

Grogan

11C4S

KIA

SVN; TF2AE, Hatchet Force, Kontum Prov.

20 Apr 71- Kevin D. Grogan, SGT E-5, USASF, Co C TA2AE (CCC)-KIA - I believe that it was early April we were given the mission of inserting west of Plei Djerang, we were to perform a blocking maneuver for the Bac Dao (Black Panther's) a somewhat elite VN regiment who was doing some kind of a sweep in  the area. We were inserted on a ridge and we moved to the high ground.  I made the decision that as it was getting late in the day we would set up a perimeter, make sure everything was in order and we would dig in and wait until first light the next day before we moved off the hill.  That night all was quiet, we got up the next morning chowed down and while I was eating, one of the Yards came up and said he had heard VN speaking, indicating a direction.  I gave instructions to get everyone up and ready to move and I took my Mountain Yard radio carrier a VN Aspiring and a squad of Yards with Sgt Grogan to investigate. We hadn't moved very far when we came on to a trail running east and west.  I started following the trail and as I stepped out from behind a  tree there was an NVA setting on a stump of a downed tree about fifty feet away.  It was an instant shoot out,  unknown to me the fallen tree was across the top of a bunker.  I dove for a log on the opposite side of the trail sliding face first behind it.  The first NVA was dead and was partially blocking the firing port of the bunker.  Every time I would raise my head Charlie would open up with his RPD. It was just after one of his longer burst's another automatic weapon cut loose and I heard Kevin say Grommet I've been hit.  We neutralized the position and crawled over to where Kevin was at. He was lying on his back and he had received four rounds to the chest.  I check for a pulse and as I did so Kevin gave off a long sigh. I called Leghorn, told them we were in contact and that we had lost an American.  It wasn't very long and John Plaster was up.  We evacuated Kevin on a Mcguire rig and they moved us to an area well cleared, by airstrikes where they pulled us out. By Gerald Denison (Gerald was stationed at FOB 2, Kontum from Sep. 67 until the 5th of Oct 68.  The last half of that year he was flying with Covey and the first half he ran RECON.  His team was Ohio. This is mention this so to explain where he was from 68 until 71.  He was shot down southeast of Attepeau in Loas while he was looking for a recon team.  He spent  the rest of 1968 and most of 69 in Valley Forge hospital.  Gerald was then assigned to 10th group and returned to Vietnam mar of 1971.  This trip he was again assigned to FOB2 but it was TF2AE and was assigned as a platoon advisor for one of the exploitation companies.  His compound was the Mike force compound in down town Kontum.  Pappy Reed was the Senior enlisted Walt Schumate was there Kevin Grogran and another young  plus some old hands that had been around Vietnam for  multiple tours)

 

1971

04

27

O-3 CPT

Frederick

Krupa

31542

MIA-PFD

SVN; TF2AE, Hatchet Force Cdr, YA624721 22k W of Sledgehammer, shot/fell from heli.

.27 Apr 71- Frederick  Krupa, CPT 0-3 of Scranton, PA USASF, Training Support Hqs, Tng Advisory Op, MIA-Presumptive finding of death. Version 1: As Krupa was about to insert his Special Commando Unit 2 miles from the Laotian border northwest of Plei Djereng, Vietnam, when the helicopter was about 3 feet from the ground it came under enemy fire. Krupa fell forward, the SCU Company A Commander Ayom grabbed his Krupap’s right shoulder but let go when his (Ayom) hand was struck by a bullet and Krupa fell out of the helicopter. Krupa was last seen lying next to a log sprawled out on his back, not moving or making a sound by crew chief SP/4 Melvin C. Lewis as the helicopter started its ascent. Version 2: Krupa was last seen Krupa was a passenger aboard the helicopter to insert troops onto a LZ. The helicopter was hit by enemy fire and Krupa was observed getting hit in the chest and fall from the aircraft. The helicopter then lifted off without realizing what had happened to Krupa. Upon learning of the incident, the pilot attempted to radio for assistance, but his radio had been hit. Photo of Fred Krupa & John Newman

Fredrick Krupa

 

1971

04

28

E-8 MSG

Donald F.

West

11F5S

KIA, DOW

SVN; TF1AE, Quang Nam Prov., booby trap while on area recon near base.

28 Apr 71- Donald F. West. SGM E-9, USASF TF1AE (CCN)-KIA

 

1971

04

29

E-6 SSG

Albert

McCoy, Jr.

11B4S

KIA, helicopter shotdown

SVN; TF1AE, RT Anaconda, ??where??, helicopter shootdown

29 Apr 71- Albert McCoy, Jr. SSG E-6, USASF, TF1AE (CCN)-KIA

 

1971

05

10

E-7 SFC

Lewis C.

Walton

96B40

MIA-PFD, recovered 19 Oct 2004

SVN; TF1AE, RT Asp, Quang Nam Prov., w/ Bingham & Luttrell, YC756573 7k NE of Ta Ko

1971

05

10

E-7 SFC

James Martin

Luttrell

11F4S

MIA-PFD, recovered in 2004

SVN; TF1AE, RT Asp, Quang Nam Prov., w/ Bingham & Walton, YC756573 7k NE of Ta Ko

1971

05

10

E-6 SSG

Klaus Y.

Bingham

12B4S

MIA-PFD, recovered in 2004

SVN; TF1AE, RT Asp, Quang Nam Prov., w/ Walton & Luttrell, YC756573 7k NE of Ta Ko

03 May 71- Klaus Y. Bingham, SSG E-6 of Wahiawa, Hawaii, James Martin Luttrell, SSG E-6 of Fayetteville, NC; and Lewis Clark Walton, SSG E-6 of Cranston, RI USASF, Recon Tm Asp, TF1AE (CCN), Da Nang, MIA- Presumptive finding of death. RT Asp was inserted 12 miles East of Laos in the A Shau Valley (Quang Nam Province) on 3 May without ground fire or radio transmission and was never seen heard from again.. On 4 May the area was searched by FAC without success. Two pilots reported seeing a mirror and panel signals on 5 May about 50 meters from the LZ and the FAC again searched the area and attempted to establish radio contact, the FAC saw two persons wearing dark green fatigues locating signal panels. Helicopters were launched but could not perform an extraction due to adverse weather. The FAC remained on station until 5 PM without making communication contact with the team. May 6 found the weather again prohibited an extraction attempt and May 7 found extraction or insertion of a search team an impossibility due to enemy fire. Adverse weather prevented insertion until 14 May. On May 14 the search team was inserted without success of locating RT Asp. (Per Cpt "Garry" George Robb, at the time of his departure as the 1-0, Rt Asp, in Nov 70, the team consisted of 3 ex-NVA and 3 Vietnames; however, the team had been shot up before the 3 May loss, thus, the exact ethnic make up of the team is unknown) {Filed By Sgt Don "Sluggo" Murphy regarding the attempted location and extraction of the 3 Americans: In mid April, 1971 two recon teams were joined to make one large raid force with a mission of hitting targets developed by the recon teams. We would launch out of MLT-1 at Phu Bai. This team was to remain at the launch site for 30 days. The two teams were Connecticut and Indtruder. SSG Andre Smith was one zero of Connecticut and SSG Eldon Bargewell had Intruder. The combined effort would field a total of 24 men. Connecticut was selected as the force's name with SSg Andree Smith as one zero and Eldon as one one. Connecticut was a Chinese Nung team and Intruder was Montagnard. RT Connecticut arrived at MLT-1 shortly before noon on 3 May 71, we checked in and went to lunch. Asp had been inserted that morning into the AO cleanly and without incident. The covey got a Team OK. (I do not know the name of the Covey Rider who inserted them) SFC Keith Kinkaid came into the mess hall and alerted us that he would be flying covey and left for his aircraft. Shortly after SSG Andree was called to the TOC and it was decided that we would go in (for RT Asp) instead of the bright light team since we had a much larger force. After a briefing on what we would do on the ground, we launched. Four slicks were loaded with six men each, we had two spare slicks on one of which was our chase medic SSG Bob Woodham. We had also four cobra gunships. I was in the lead slick with Andree Smith, Phun An Sang (Nung Interpreter), One other Nung, Sgt Mudhole Waters and one Montagnard. We would be inserting on Asp';s primary LZ. To approach the LZ we had to fly up a valley with high ridges on left and right. Just prior to short final we began taking effective fire from the ridges and the LZ. NVA were in the open firing at us and we all were returning fire. Andree aborted the mission. We took fire until we cleared the ridges passing over the LZ. I observed no bodies on the LZ but plenty of NVA. We returned to Danang since it was closer to inspect the slicks for battle damage. After refueling, we returned to Phu Bai to make another attempt this time on Asp's alternate LZ but bad weather precluded this. Now a large storm hit the area and no aircraft could be launched. Walton, Bingham, and Luttrell were officially listed as MIA. The weather finally cleared on the 11th. We would raid a farming area close to the area where Asp was lost with hopes of capturing a PW who would possibly enlighten us as to Asp's fate. The insert went in cleanly and we began recon by fire. After an hour of movement we stopped near the river by an animal fence. We had one heat casualty (Sgt Eaton) . Andree called for extract, to this point we had no contact with the enemy. As the birds came in and picked up the team. Sgt Waters, Myself and two indig (tailgunners) would cover fro the fence line. During the extract we could hear screaming, the cobras were firing on a large NVA force crossing the river coming at us. We laid down Car15 and 40mm fire on them as they approached. Andree fired his RPG 4 and killed 5 just as the four of us raced for the slick. On extract we were hit in the tailboom by a 23mm, which only got off one burst, the cobras got him. Cobras claimed 37 killed. In my opinion of what happened. The team hit the LZ but was ambushed during movement. What the Viets said is probably true they left the bodies where they lay) (Filed by BG Bargewell: first one of the covey riders saw 2 people on the LZ the day before we eventually went into on the last day and that they had put a red panel in the middle of the LZ--that's why we went in to that LZ. we figured it was put there to lure us in but we went anyway cause we had nothing else to go on. also months later there was a NVA captured-by who I cant remember- that supposedly said something to the effect that the team had walked into a small jungle village near their insert LZ and were ambushed and all US were killed. Frankly I don't know if this was ever verified but it was passed to us as Intel.- the most exciting thing that happened to me on that mission was when Andre, that crazy SOB, fired the RPG the first time--he turned 90 degrees quickly and fired and I was standing about 6 ft behind him at that point and I thought Id been hit from all the backblast--got my heart rate up a few mil anyway and blew me down on the ground--unhurt except for my ego from not paying attention to what he was up to---my yards thought it was funny anyway.) NOTE: THIS IS THE SECOND TIME ST/RT ASP WAS LOST. ON 28 MAR 68, ST ASP WAS LOST THE FIRST TIME.  . Case #1245) ON 3 MAY 1971 SSG JAMES M. LUTTRELL, SSG LEWIS C. WALTON, AND SSG KLAUS Y. BINGHAM, WERE MEMBERS OF A LONG RANGE RECONNAISSANCE PATROL (LRRP) WHICH WAS INSERTED INTO AN AREA AT GRID COORDINATES YC 756 573 IN SOUTH VIETNAM AND WERE NEVER HEARD FROM AGAIN. THE INSERTION OF THE PATROL WAS MADE WITHOUT GROUND FIRE OR RADIO TRANSMISSIONS. ON 4 MAY 1971 THE AREA WAS SEARCHED BY FORWARD AIR CONTROLLERS (FAC) WHO NEITHER SAW NOR HEARD ANYTHING FROM THE TEAM. LATER, ON 5 MAY, TWO PILOTS WHO WERE FLYING IN THIS AREA REPORTED SEEING MIRROR AND PANEL SIGNALS 50 METERS WEST OF THE LANDING ZONE FOR ABOUT 15 MINUTES. THE AREA WAS SEARCHED AGAIN FOR ABOUT THREE HOURS AND THE FAC ATTEMPTED TO CALL THE TEAM ON RADIO. AT 1404 HOURS, (ON MAY 5), THE FAC SAW TWO PEOPLE WEARING DARK GREEN FATIGUES LOCATING PANEL SIGNALS. HELICOPTERS WERE LAUNCHED AT 1500 HOURS THAT DAY WITH A RESCUE TEAM, BUT COULD NOT BE INSERTED BECAUSE OF BAD WEATHER. THE FAC STAYED ON STATION UNTIL 1700 HOURS, BUT NO COMMUNICATIONS WERE EVER ESTABLISHED. ON 6 MAY WEATHER AGAIN PROHIBITED SEARCH ATTEMPTS, AND ON 7 MAY HOSTILE FIRE IN THE AREA PREVENTED THE INSERTION OF THE RESCUE TEAM. POOR WEATHER PREVENTED THE INSERTION OF A SEARCH TEAM UNTIL 14 MAY, THE RESCUE TEAM WAS EXTRACTED THAT SAME DAY WITHOUT EVER HEAVING SEEN OR HEARD FROM THE PATROL.  During the General Membership Meeting at the SOA Reunion, SOAR XXVIII, Mr Dickie Hites, Special Advisor, to the CG of JPAC, Hawaii, presented a brief update on his trip to SE Asia. He mentioned the remains of Klaus Bigham, Jim Lutrell, and Lewis Walton of RT ASP from CCN, lost on 10 May 1971 had been found.

BinghamKJ01c.jpgPhoto Klaus Y, Bingham from Virtual Wall Staff Sgt. Lewis Clark Walton Sr., who was posthumously promoted to Sgt. 1st Class, smiles in a photo taken of him in his Vietnam War era uniform during his time in the Green Berets. His remains were escorted on May 1 from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command at Hickam AFB, Hawaii, to Rhode Island by his son, Sgt. 1st Class Lewis Clark Jr., 115th Military Police Company, Rhode Island National Guard, for burial. Photo by Courtesy


   

OIF Vet Escorts Father's Remains Home from Vietnam May 09, 2007
BY Staff Sgt. Matthew Chlosta

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, May 9, 2007) - Sgt. 1st Class Lewis Clark Walton Jr. has completed two combat tours in Iraq. His father, Sgt. 1st Class Lewis Clark Walton Sr., only recently made it home from his second tour in Vietnam. Sgt. 1st Class Walton Jr. escorted his father's remains from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command on Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, to his hometown of East Greenwich, R.I., for burial May 1. "This is very rare, that we have a son escort remains," said Steve Thompson, JPAC external relations officer....On May 3, 1971, then Staff Sgt. Lewis C. Walton Sr., was inserted with two fellow green beret Soldiers and five Vietnamese into a remote area of South Vietnam near Da Nang to conduct a long-range reconnaissance patrol. The patrol members were ambushed and died without burial. JPAC teams surveyed and excavated the site five times between 1993 to 2006. Not only did they find material evidence at the site that was consistent with U.S. Army infantry equipment, they discovered a set of airborne "jump wings" and a St. Christopher medallion. Sgt. 1st Class Walton Jr. said his father had soldered together a set of airborne wings and a St. Christopher medal to carry for good luck. Sgt. 1st Class Walton Sr. was identified using mitochondrial DNA by scientists at JPAC's Central Identification Lab...."To say thank you is an understatement," he said. "We've always had the hope that he'd be found somewhere, someday, and in good enough condition to bring home." Sgt. 1st Class Walton Jr. said his father inspired him to join the Army. "I knew I was going in the military," said the 40-year-old and 21-year Army veteran, said. "I come from a very patriotic family." "The last time I remember him I was two, other than pictures and videos," Sgt. 1st Class Walton Jr., said. "One picture I vividly remember was from Vietnam after his first tour, gear in one hand and me being held by the other. "To come full circle, obviously you feel a sense of relief or some closure. The main thing is you are bringing them home." Sgt. 1st Class Walter Jr. is an active-duty National Guard and Reserve Soldier with the 115th Military Police Company.

Notes from The Virtual Wall

On 3 May 1971 Reconnaissance Team ASP was inserted into the area south of the A Shau Valley about 9 miles east of the Lao/SVN border. The six-man team's mission was to observe and report on enemy activity along a tributary of the Ho Chi Minh Trail which entered SVN at this point. The team consisted of

bullet

SSgt Klaus J. Bingham;

bullet

SSgt James M. Luttrell;

bullet

SSgt Lewis C. Walton; and

bullet

five Montagnard troops, names unknown.

The insertion was successful and apparently went undetected by the North Vietnamese. After an initial radio report the team proceeded under radio silence - and disappeared. On 04 May, forward air controllers searched the area but were unable to locate the team or to establish radio contact. On 05 May, aerial observers noted signal mirror flashes near the insertion point and sighted two men in dark green fatigues placing signal panels. Although no radio contact was made with the team, helicopters with a rescue team were launched at 1500 hours but could not make the insertion because of bad weather. Fixed-wing FACs remained overhead until 1700 without contacting or sighting the team. On 06 May weather again prohibited search attempts, and on 07 May hostile fire in the area prevented the insertion of a rescue team. Poor weather then set in, preventing insertion of a search team until 14 May. The team was extracted the same day without having seen or heard from the missing patrol. Recon Team ASP was given up for lost and the three Americans were placed in Missing in Action status. They were carried as MIA until the Secretary of the Army finally approved Presumptive Findings of Death for the three men - Bingham on 27 May 77, Luttrell on 20 Oct 78, and Walton on 12 Oct 78. Their remains were never recovered.

UPDATE

The Library of Congress recently has made available documentation regarding US POW/MIA personnel and a search of the documentation regarding RT ASP has produced additional information. In 1993, a JTF-FA team visited the locale and interviewed long-time residents, including several who were involved in the fighting which destroyed Recon Team ASP. In summary, a forty-man local militia (VC) force tracked down the team, killing the three Americans and one ARVN. On 04 May the remaining four ARVNs were sighted trying to signal search aircraft, were attacked, and were killed. The militiamen said the bodies were left where they fell - none were buried. An initial exploration of the battle sites failed to locate anything of material importance. In 2003 a JTF-FA team returned to the village. Although initial searches and excavations recovered only limited personal effects the site was recommended for continued investigation. In 2004 excavations recovered additional personal effects, including a distinctive Saint Christopher's medal, and very fragmented remains which were repatriated to the United States on 19 October 2004. On 23 Oct 2006 the remains were approved as being those of Lewis C. Walton. SFC Walton's son, SFC Lewis Clark Walton Jr., 115th MP Company, Rhode Island National Guard, traveled to Hawaii bring his father�s remains home. The younger SFC Walton, now a veteran of two tours of duty in Iraq, was 4 years old when his father left for his second tour of duty in Vietnam. A Mass of Christian Burial was held May 5th 2007 at Saint Anthony's Church, Providence RI, followed by burial with full Military Honors in the Rhode Island Veterans Cemetery, Exeter, RI.

17 May 71- Dale Allen Pearce, WO-1 of Mentor, OH; David Pecor Soyland, WO-1 of Rapid City, SD, and Two Door Gunners (Names and ranks unknown) UH-IH helicopter aircrew, Ops 32/75 C CO, 158TH AVN BN, 101 ABN DIV, Three bodies were recovered and one is listed as MIA. These men were lost when their helicopter was shot down while attempting an extraction of  recon team Alaska.

Notes from The Virtual Wall

Reconnaissance Team ALASKA was inserted into the Da Krong Valley, Thua Thien Province, SVN, reportedly on 8 May 1971. The team consisted of

bullet1st Lt Danny D. Entrican, team leader;
bulletSSG Dale W. Dehnke;
bulletSP5 Gary L. Hollingsworth; and
bulletthree Nung troops.

On 17 May, while about a mile from the Laotian/SVN border northwest of Khe Sanh, the team was engaged by a larger NVA force and called for an emergency extraction. SSG Dehnke, SP5 Hollingsworth, and one Nung were killed in the fighting; Entrican and the other two Nungs attempted to evade the NVA. Surviving commando Truong Minh Long and interpreter Truong To Ha stated that they rolled downhill after a hostile search party detected them hiding in the bush. Entrican, who apparently was wounded, yelled at them to move out and try to make the pickup alone.

C Company, 158th Aviation Battalion, had been tasked with extracting the recon team and launched an assault/extraction flight from Camp Evans. One of the assault helicopters involved, UH-1H tail number 67-17607, was crewed by

bulletW1 David P. Soyland, aircraft commander and pilot;
bulletW1 Dale A. Pearce, copilot;
bulletSP5 Harold E. Parker, crew chief; and
bulletSP4 Gary A. Alcorn, door gunner.

As gunship support for the extraction, Soyland was first into the area and encountered heavy enemy fire. As he banked the aircraft to the right, it was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade which severed the tail boom, causing an immediate crash. The aircraft impacted on its right side on a slope, sliding downhill until it stopped at the bottom of the slope. Warrant Officer Pearce was killed in the crash, but the other three crewmen were able to exit the aircraft.

Heavy enemy fire precluded insertion of ground forces until the next day, when additional ground forces were inserted in an attempt to recover the survivors of both RT ALASKA and the downed Huey. SP5 Parker, SP4 Alcorn, and the two surviving Nungs were found alive. While Pearce's remains were identified the rescue party lacked the tools needed to free his body from the wreckage. The bodies of Hollingsworth, Dehnke, and the Nung trooper were recovered. SP4 Alcorn reported that he saw a man, believed to be WO Soyland, running on the crest of a nearby ridge, but although search efforts continued until 27 May the searchers were unable to locate either 1LT Entrican or WO Soyland.

Entrican and Soyland both were classed as missing in action. Enemy documents dated May 1971 were later captured and mentioned an American captured in the area, but it was impossible to determine if the documents referred to Entrican or Soyland. Both men were carried as Missing in Action until the Secretary of the Army approved Presumptive Findings of Death (Soyland on 10 Apr 1978; Entrican on 6 Dec 1978).

 

1971

05

18

O-2 1LT

Danny D.

Entrican

31542

MIA-PFD, BNR

SVN; TF1AE, RT Alaska, w/ Dehnke & Hollingsworth, YD036214 30k SE of A-101 new Lang Vei

1971

05

18

E-5 SP5

Gary L.

Hollingsworth

12B4S

KIA

SVN; TF1AE, RT Alaska, w/ Entrican & Denhke, YD036214 30k SE of A-101 new Lang Vei

1971

05

18

E-5 SGT

Dale W.

Dehnke

11B4S

KIA

SVN; TF1AE, RT Alaska, w/ Entrican & Hollingsworth, YD036214 30k SE of A-101 new Lang Vei

18 May 71- Danny Day Entrican, 1LT 0-2 of Brookhaven, Mass and Dale W Dehnke, SSG E-6, Gary L. Hollingsworth, SP/5, USASF, TF1AE (CCN), RT Alaska, 0ps32 Lt Entrican MIA-Presumptive finding of death. SSG Dehnke, SSG Hollingsworth and the scout was KIA-RR. (Dale Dehnke was killed on his 23rd birthday, he was my one zero of RT Crusader and was strap hanging with Alaska. Don Kelly)

RT Alaska was inserted in the Da Krong Valley on 15 May and the team was attacked by an enemy force three days later 1 mile from the Laos boarder. Two surviving commandos, Truong Mihn Long and interpreter Trong Th Ha reported they rolled downhill after a hostile search party detected them hiding in a bush, at which point Entrican was apparently wounded and yelled at them to move out. This action resulted in the separation of the team members. Lt Entrican was last seen wounded, but alive and attempting to evade the enemy. A search was initiated but all attempts were unsuccessful. One Special Commando Scout (name unknown) was killed while performing Body Recovery of the downed helicopter and for SSG Dehnke's remains. SSG Dehnke was originally assigned to CCS; however, when CCS was closed, he transferred to CCN July 70.

glh.jpg (25874 bytes)Gary Hollingsworth Danny D EntricanDanny Entrican Dale W DehnkeDale Dehnke

Note: an email was received from a personal close friend of Dale's and some of the information he shared, I feel needs to be listed. "I never knew what happened to Dale until I found your site...Dale grew up in Santa Monica, CA and was a good student and a very good baseball player. His dad pushed him very hard to go on with baseball, and Dale got very frustrated and quit playing and joined the army. Dale was killed on his 23rd birthday and one year later, his father sat on Dale's grave and took his own life. It was so sad, because they were a great family and even now, his mom is unable to talk about Dale or his dad. I named my 1st son after Dale, and am very proud that I did. Never a day goes by that I don't think about him and wished he were still here." Jim Hollingsworth, Gary's son sent this email, 03/29/00: "Thank You for a fantastic site. My dad Gary Lynn Hollingsworth was KIA on 18 MAY 71. I have been searching for information regarding the mission he was on when he was killed and never found *anything* until I discovered your site..."

Additional Information: Few more bits of info on the 18 MAY op. Have some vivid bits, as well as some pretty hazy recollections -- so beware of "holes". When Alaska called in that they were being hit, MSG Budrow (MLT #1 1SG) sent in 4 or 5 birds for the extraction. It was approx. 1600hrs -- getting late. I think Cheney was flying covey (Cheney, Budrow, and XXX? -- name slips my memory this moment -- flew covey for over 24 hours straight). Jim Woodham was flying Chase medic on Bird #2; I was Chase Medic on #4. As bird #1 went in to attempt the extraction, the green was very heavy and it was shot down in triple canopy jungle. Woodham took a round through his leg, and Covey called off the attempt to regroup and send in a Bright Light. It slips my mind which team that was, but the 10 was a 1LT (that ought to be easy to figure out which team -- very few LTs in CCN). I went as the medic. We were on the ground around 1800 -- dark already. We moved off the LZ and set up a perimeter to wait for first light. At first light, we started up a forested hill and ran into automatic fire. The Point was hit in the face and neck, and our 11 took fragments to his face. I saw that the 11's wounds didn't involve the eye and were mostly small bleeders, so I worked on the Point trying to get an airway started; the 11 patched himself up with the help of one of the Yards and the LT. We called for extraction, and a bird sent up from MLT 2 with their Chase Medic (Buddy Richmond) came in for the wounded. We also left. MSG Budrow then immediately got together another Bright Light (Rick Hendrix's team), and I went with them within about 2 hours. We located one American and one Yard -- both killed and stripped. As I recall, they were both shot in the temple. Rick identified the American because of a "Grade A Government Inspected" tattoo on the American's buttock (Hendrix will remember who this was, for sure). We then worked our way to the downed chopper and we found no bodies. I think that they might have been picked up by one of the first choppers on the first day -- but it's now hard to believe they didn't suffer some serious injuries in the crash, and since there was no place for the pickup chopper to land, it would have meant chopper crews leaving their aircraft and entering the woods for some distance -- not likely. I'd like to know what happened to them, as well as other details and corrections to my memory. by Steve Yevich.

I remember Gary, quite well. He was in my One Zero class. Gary had a tattoo on his butt that looked like a Gov't food stamp (the kind they used to stamp on meat). The tattoo said, "US Gov't inspected prime meat". The tattoo was used to ID his body because his head was mostly blown off. Gary was captured and assassinated. I think that MacGlothern was on the Bright Light that recovered him-By: Robby Robinson.

There is a web site dedicated to Daniel Day Entrician put together by a high school kid named Trevor. He has interviewed almost everyone who was involved with Danny, Dale, and Holly. Danny was not wounded during the initial attack. Dale was killed and Holly was severely wounded. Danny and the surviving team members refused to leave Holly. During the night the NVA came into their positions and one was actually shot as he pilfered a canteen of water from one of the dead scu. (This is right out of the AAR) Despite everyone telling Danny to E&E, Danny didn't leave the hilltop until first light the next morning. One of the surviving SCU said that as they ran, the NVA started shooting. He thought he heard Danny scream OHH! In Veith's book, BRIGHTLIGHT, he quotes an NVA soldier who describes an American in a cage in an area on the trail close in location. By: James E. Butler.

I was on stand-down having just returned from a mission and Pat Hemminger, who was recovering from wounds, and I went to Thailand for RR. Pat and I made our way to Bangkok and then from there north to where Pat's wife and family lived. I stayed the night and the next day Pat's sister-in-law escorted me on the train to Ubon where I met up with my father who was a Lt.Col in the Air Force and the Commander of an AC-130 Gun Ship. On the night of May 18th my father arranged it for me to fly with him and his crew. We departed after dark and were over the Trail having a whale of a time shooting up Ho's trucks, guns and anything else that would pop up. I don't remember the exact time but "Moonbeam" (the air borne C&C ship) called and requested that we divert and support a TIC (Troops in contact). As I remember at first the crew was disappointed because normally there was not much to see in the support of a TIC and they usually received to feed back as to how well they did. Upon arriving on the scene my dad was given the frequency of the ground commander. At that time we did not know it was a CCN recon team. When my dad tried to establish contact, I was standing behind him with an headset on, we could barely make out what was going on. My dad asked him to mark his perimeter but the ground commander said he was surrounded and couldn't do that. The ground commander finally requested that Spectre fire danger close. As was the procedure then, my dad asked him for his unit ID and initials. Only then did the light bulb go off and I explained to my dad what was probably going on. My dad told Gary that he had one of his own on board and that he understood. Gary acknowledged and Spectre began to fire when and where Gary wanted. It was very hard to understand Gary at the time. He was speaking low and soft. My dad had to keep asking him for strike reports and what he wanted them to do next. Keep firing and close the ring as tight as possible is what it boiled down to. Gary reported several times that Spectre was chopping the enemy to pieces and then would direct Spectre to keep firing. As I recall Gary did say that as far as he knew he was the only friendly left alive. As dawn approached and fuel was running low my dad told the engineer to quit reminding him that fuel was low and just tell him when he had absolutely the bare minimum to return home. We continued to fire support for Gary and as far as I know he was still alive when we finally left that morning. When the engineer called it my dad broke out of orbit and we headed for Ubon. The crew was chuted up and quite, I think begin low on fuel and saddened that we couldn't remain on station. We listened as long as we could to radio traffic from Gary's location and knew that the Bright Light had been launched and was in route. I don't know how long it was from the time we left till someone showed up. The Spectre gunships of those days are quite different from those of today. To the brave men who flew those gunships and supported Special ops teams, my hats off to them. Everytime the guns fired or the radio was keyed the recorders and cameras on board came on. The historic files of the 16th SOS should contain the after action reports, recordings and films from that mission. I know I saw the films and listen to the tapes at the after mission debriefing which were conducted after every mission. The Spectre crews and the fast movers who flew cover for them were in attendance. By: Bob Castillo RT Idaho, CCN 

Dale Dehnke (in head band) & Danny Entrican (back facing camera) - See Dale's memorial, click-->Dale

Several other photo's of Dale and another of Lt Entrican

See Danny Entrican's memorial--->Entrican

Notes from The Virtual Wall

Recon Team ALASKA, consisting of three US special forces soldiers and three Nung troops, was inserted into the Da Krong Valley, Thua Thien Province, SVN, reportedly on 8 May 1971; the team leader was 1st Lt Danny D. Entrican. On 18 May, when located about a mile from the Laotian/SVN border, RT ALASKA was engaged by an NVA force and called for an emergency extraction.

Two Americans - SP5 Gary L. Hollingsworth and SSG Dale W. Dehnke - and one Nung were killed in the fighting; Entrican and the other two Nungs attempted to evade the NVA. Surviving commando Truong Minh Long and interpreter Truong To Ha stated that they rolled downhill after a hostile search party detected them hiding in the bush. Entrican, who apparently was wounded, yelled at them to move out and try to make the pickup alone. Meanwhile, the pick-up helicopter, a UH-1H Huey (tail number 67-17607, C Co, 158th Avn Bn) crewed by

bullet

WO David P. Soyland, pilot,

bullet

WO Dale A. Pearce, copilot,

bullet

SP5 Harold E. Parker, crew chief, and

bullet

SP4 Gary A. Alcorn, door gunner,

was hit by automatic weapons and RPG fire as it approached the pickup point, rolled over, impacted on its right side, and slid down a slope. Warrant Officer Pearce was killed in the crash, but the other three crewmen were able to exit the aircraft. Additional ground forces were inserted in an attempt to recover the survivors of both RT ALASKA and the downed Huey. SP5 Parker, SP4 Alcorn, and the two surviving Nungs were found alive. While Pearce's remains were identified the rescue party lacked the tools needed to free his body from the wreckage. The bodies of Hollingsworth, Dehnke, and the two Nungs were recovered. SP4 Alcorn reported that he saw a man, believed to be WO Soyland, running on the crest of a nearby ridge, but although search efforts continued until 27 May the searchers were unable to locate either 1LT Entrican or WO Soyland. Enemy documents dated May 1971 later captured mentioned an American captured in the area, but it was impossible to determine if the documents referred to Entrican or Soyland. Both men were carried as Missing in Action until the Secretary of the Army approved Presumptive Findings of Death (Soyland on 10 Apr 1978; Entrican on 6 Dec 1978).

The information above is summarized from several sources, including the POW Network site, the Vietnam Helicopter Pilots' Assn database, and the 1992 Senate Select Committee Report as contained on the Advocacy and Intelligence Index for POW/MIA site.

1971

05

20

O-3 CPT

Scott H.

Newport

39301

KIA

SVN; TF3AE, Darlac Prov., S-2

20 May 71- Scott H. Newport, CPT 0-3, TF3AE (CCS), Ban Me Thout, Ops 35 Killed while participating in SOG activities? , RR?? 39301: However, he is listed on the Virtual Vietnam Memorial as being the a Tactical Intelligence Staff Officer (G2, S2) (Special Forces Qual) ASSIGNED TO TRNG ADV GRP, USARV which is in error. 

      "I knew Scott Newport well.  He originally arrived at CCS as a 1LT in the late Fall of 1970.  If memory serves me, he was the Asst S-2 under Bill Tangney.  I believe Scott became the S-2 in early 1971 when Bill took command of the Northern Launch Site.  He and I were on a CCK Flight together in December 1970.  Upon return he returned to CCS, which was shortly to be renamed TF3AE when 5th Group returned stateside.  I went to Saigon in January 1971 to take command of the LB from Jack Keller.  Again, if my memory still serves me, Scotty had just been promoted to CPT only a month or two before he was killed.  Upon his death I was told that, as the S-2, he was making a visit to a local village to meet with some of the village elders.  He was accompanied by a platoon (I believe from Security Company).  I also seem to recall that he was the only American and they were traveling in a ducenhalf.  They were ambushed as they arrived at the village.  My recollection is that Scotty was the only casualty, and in the back of my mind I seem to recall the prevailing thought was that he was specifically targeted.  I remember the bad guys took his Rolex.  I've cc'd both Bill Tangney and Bill Dadek, who were both at CCS/TF3AE at the time and may be able to provide more detail.  Bill Holden was the Commander of the unit at the time of this incident, but I do not have his contact information.  I'll let you know if I recall any additional details.  VR" - Troy Gilley, Recon Co Cmdr,  CCS,

     "I can vouch for the fact that Capt. Scott Herbert Newport was serving with TF3AE when he was killed as a result of hostile action. Captain Newport was involved in the relocation of a local Montagnard village and he was in the lead vehicle (I believe that he was driver) on a small convoy entering a village that had been vacated. This was to be his last visit to the site to pick up the last remaining items for the move. I was among the first to respond to the site for an assessment. It appeared that he had entered into the kill zone of what I would term as a "textbook" ambush -- his jeep was hit in the grill by an RPG and Scott was able to exit the vehicle and take partial cover in a slight depression by a tree and returned fire. As an Infantry officer, I recall a certain lack of respect for Scott since he was an Intel officer -- after making an assessment of the scene, however, I gained a great deal of respect for Capt Newport because he was able to return fire and expended several magazines before he was fatally wounded -- he died in that slight depression from, as I recall, an extensive head wound. I had been an exploitation platoon leader (the same platoon MSG Jerry "Mad Dog" Shriver was with when he went missing) for nearly nine months before Capt. Newport was killed. At the time Newport died I was serving as an assist S-2 and my assigned area was the southern portion of Cambodia. I have forwarded this message to Captain David "TJ" Pollard. He was a fellow platoon leader who was serving as the unit S-4 at the time Newport died. Captain Pollard has a much better memory for details and I'm sure that he will correct me if I've made any mistakes . . . Thank You /s/ Lewis B Arnold" 

   Troy,,
     "I also knew Scott well,  He and I had the same taste in music and shared cassettes.  His room was two doors from mine. He was, as I remember, going with a Med visit to a local village to get intel from the village elders.  I seem to remember the medic was a US but I may be wrong.  I was at the launch site, Bill Tangney had remained at CCS that day to attend to some business/coordination.  I received a call at mid morning from Bill saying to send the guns back, ASAP.  I did and upon their return to the launch site learned that a US was killed, I confirmed later that it was Scott.  Everyone else had gotten away alive.  Scott had taken cover in a depression and was found with all his ammo fired and empty mags around his body.  They did take his rolex, car-15, and equipment.  It was a well set ambush, they seemed to have been after him!
    Bill Tangney was coordinating the response of the guns from CCS and may have more information and a better memory of the attack.
     Troy is correct about the timing for Scott arriving and when he became S2.  He was a Cpt when killed. Bill Dadek
 

 

1971

06

5

E-5 SGT

John R.

Jones

11B4S

MIA-PFD

SVN; TF1AE, Quang Tri Prov., Hickory Site, XD844455

05 Jun 71- John Robert Jones, SGT E-5, USASF, TF1AE (CCN), Training Advisory Op, Da Nang, KIA. Jones was performing defense duties of a remote radio relay site "Hickory Hill" ( Hill 950) located deep in enemy held territory at Khe Sanh when attacked by a battalion size enemy force. The site is normally defended by two Americans and about 40 Indigenous soldiers. However, there were 27 Americans and 67 SCU, which includes a squad from L Co, 75th Rangers defending the site this date. Evacuation started but due to adverse weather conditions, the evacuation was halted leaving SGT Jones and Jon Cavaiani, SSG E-6, with about 20 indigenous soldiers who fought on through the night SGT Jones was KIA- and his body not recovered and SSG Cavaiani was captured and untimely released in 1973. SSG Cavainai was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously for his action as he was originally thought to have been killed in action.

      ADDED: Reference Hickory Radio Relay Site. In October/November of 1969, when I was Opns Officer at CCN, the Marines pulled off of Hickory without notice. Our radio people had to relocate to Fuller Marine Base. However, our antennas were masked in that location. The next day we airlifted back into Hickory to resume our activities using our own companies/platoons as security. Hickory was in shambles as the Marines had blown up everything. The unfortunate part of this story is that we lost a recon team in Laos because of no radio contact. Each Tuesday I would go to Phu Bai and brief 24th Army Corps about significant activities in our AO. I informed the G2 and the Chief of Staff as usual. The reopening of Hickory called for a special briefing to Gen Mel Zais, Corps Commander. I had been his football coach in the 187th and we met frequently in the Pentagon. His words were " Speedy, I don't know if we can get your guys out if they are overrun." I responded by saying that we were radio blind without Hickory and that we would have to stay."  BG “Speedy” George Gaspard (then a Major), CCN

 

ANNOUNCEMENT: August 1, 2012-Sgt Jone's remains have been recovered, his family notified, awaiting instructions from family on internment details.

John R. Jones on Hickory RR, Hill 950

 

Interview of Jon Cavaiani that describes the events of the fall of Hickory: http://www.pritzkermilitary.org/whats_on/medal-honor/medal-honor-recipient-jon-cavaiani-interview/

 

Soldier Missing from Vietnam War Identified
The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from the Vietnam War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.
Army Sgt. John R. Jones, of Louisville, Ky., will be buried Dec. 6, in Arlington National Cemetery. On June 4, 1971, Jones was part of a U.S. team working with indigenous commandos to defend a radio-relay base, known as Hickory Hill, in Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam. When enemy forces attacked the site, Jones and another serviceman took up a defensive position in a nearby bunker. The following morning, Jones was reportedly killed by enemy fire and the other soldier was captured and held as a POW until 1973.
From 1993 to 2010, joint U.S.-Socialist Republic of Vietnam (S.R.V.) teams, led by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC), conducted several investigations, surveyed the site and interviewed multiple witnesses, including those involved in the battle. During that time, analysts from JPAC and DPMO evaluated wartime records and eyewitness accounts to determine possible excavation sites. In 2011, another joint U.S.-S.R.V team located human remains in a bunker suspected to be the last known location of Jones.
For the identification of the remains, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools, such as dental records and mitochondrial DNA that matched Jones' mother and brother.
Since 1973 more than 900 servicemen have been accounted for from the Vietnam War, and returned to their families for burial with military honors. The U.S. government continues to work closely with the governments of Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia to recover all Americans lost in the conflict.
For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

 

In a message dated 12/6/2012 6:32:54 P.M. Central Standard Time, sunnyuno@verizon.net writes:
The funeral was well attended by SOG and many more- + guys who were there in the battle. Only a younger brother and 2 sisters still around but you could see they were deeply touched. Full honors with all the best US Army Honor Guard had to offer. Cdr 5th Group three star Charlie Cleveland and several other active duty command. George W "Sunny" Hewitt
In a message dated 12/6/2012 6:57:00 P.M. Central Standard Time, gilleyt@rdr.com writes:
Robert - FYI, I attended the interment of our comrade John Jones this
morning. After 41 years it was nice nice to see a fallen hero returned
to his home to finally rest with the other fallen heroes in ANC. It was
fair turnout. His brother and sister came in from Texas, Jon
Cavaiani (another great hero) was there. Also, in attendance was Scotty
Crerae (an SF Legend). Charlie Cleveland (LTG, USASOC Commander) was
there to present the flag to his family. And, several other SOG vets from
CCN & CCC, and CCS were in attendance to pay their respects to a fallen
comrade-in-arms. VR - Troy
In a message dated 1/2/2013 1:06:53 P.M. Central Standard Time, ltgargaz@q.com writes:
G. Duane Whitman (ASA) who attended the Dec 6 ceremonies discovered this nice article. Thanks, Duane.
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Brother of MIA soldier killed in Vietnam, reflects on 2012 burial

Ed Todd | Posted: Wednesday, January 2, 2013 10:09 am

ODESSA — At long last, James Jones felt "peaceful and calm" after 40 grievous years longing to embrace his valiant brother just as he has done symbolically at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall.

His brother's name is etched there in stately granite among the names of 58,200 fallen American warriors in the Vietnam War. The peace that enveloped Jones in late 2012 was profoundly poignant at the Arlington National Cemetery four decades after his older brother, John Robert Jones, a 22-year-old Green Beret sergeant, had perished in combat on June 5, 1971. He had been missing in action (MIA) throughout those years. "I always looked up to my brother," Jones, 58, said at his Odessa office of the Ector County Youth Center where he is facility director. "He has been my hero, being in (the United States Army's) Special Forces, something to be proud of, the best of the best."

John Jones was posthumously awarded the Silver Star for valor (gallantry in combat), the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster for heroic action and the Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross. "He was my hero, the one I wanted to emulate, cool, laid-back, handsome young man," reflected Jones, who was 17 when his brother was declared MIA. "John was my big brother. We always looked up to him."

His brother, robust, stalwart and hearty at 5-foot-4 and 120 pounds, accomplished what James Jones, 5-foot-10 and athletically stoutly built, had envisioned for himself — honorably serving in the military. Their late father, Samuel Houston Jones, served in World War II as a member of the Navy Seabees in building aircraft landing fields on Pacific islands and later became a career Army soldier.

John Jones was born in February 1949 in Kentucky and grew up in El Paso after his father was transferred to Fort Bliss. James Jones' plans to serve in the military where thwarted when he suffered a serious high-school football injury that precluded military service but allowed him to serve in law enforcement.

His soldier-brother remained MIA until late in 2011 when two survivors of his outfit, platoon leader Jon Cavaiani and platoon radioman Larry Page, returned to the mountain-top post, site of Jones' last battle, with the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) to seek remains of Sgt. Jones. DNA markings confirmed his remains not found in previous searches and excavations.

Leading up to that two-day 1971 firefight in which he became MIA, Jones, an expert in light and heavy weaponry, and his platoon and the Montagnard commandos assigned to him were responsible for defending the top-secret "Explorer" radio-relay base atop Hickory Hill 950. The base was deep in enemy-held territory and overlooked the abandoned Khe Sanh Combat Base near the Demilitarized Zone.

The "Explorer" intercepted communist radio transmissions, including enemy troop movements, and was targeted by the enemy for destruction. Most of the platoon's soldiers had been evacuated by helicopter before the mountain-top post got "socked in," thereby leaving Jones, Cavaiani and Montagnard commandos to defend the "Explorer" post. Cavaiani, who survived, was taken prisoner and later was awarded the Medal of Honor for "conspicuous gallantry" in the June 4-5 firefight.

"John was a real live hero, most definitely the best of the best," James Jones said of his brother. "He loved being outdoors, loved what he was doing (in the military),"' including training the Montagnards (Vietnamese mountain dwellers) commando tactics and skills. "When he went to Vietnam, he was happy to be there. His whole attitude was he was a warrior. He wanted to serve his country."

Almost 42 years following his death, John Jones was accorded solemn rites at The Old Post Chapel and burial at Arlington National Cemetery across the Potomac River from the nation's capital. The imposing scene was of horseback soldiers attached to the celebrated Old Guard Caisson Platoon honoring the fallen warrior. Seven Old Guard soldiers fired three volleys each in honoring Jones. "It is a fitting home for my brother, (being) with the other warriors and heroes," said James Jones, who was accompanied by his wife, Kathy, and his sister, Sammie Jones Rider.

The historic cemetery bears the watchword "Where Valor Proudly Sleeps" taken from the 19th-century haunting poem "Bivouac of the Dead" by Theodore O'Hara.

Especially affecting James Jones was meeting his "brother's (Green Beret) friends, great people, nice people, the type of people that this country would be proud of and are proud of, every one of them."

Among the platoon's survivors at the ceremony were Larry Page, platoon radio operator, who gave his John Jones MIA bracelet to the brother; Jon Cavaiani, Roger Hill, Skip Holland and Horace Boner.

For the 40 years after his brother was declared MIA, James Jones had never given up hope that someday his hero-brother would return home. His faith in America's warrior ethos, expressed in the Soldier's Creed as "I will never leave a fallen comrade behind," remains ever hopeful. The JPAC estimated 88,000 Americans are MIA in the nation's wars since World War II and reportedly 1,200 of those are from the Vietnam War. JPAC's motto is "Until They Are Home."

"It is true," James Jones said gratefully, based on his brother's case, that America will "leave no one behind" and that its warriors "will never be forgotten."

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1971

06

21

E-7 SFC

Billy J.

Watson

11F4S

DNH, vehicle vs Claymore

SVN; TF3AE, Darlac Prov., returning from BMT; lightning set off a Claymore in 

ARVN compound

21 Jun 71-Billy J. Watson, TF3AE, died as a result of a Claymore detonation caused by lightening.-Non Hostile.

 

1971

06

22

E-6 SSG

Madison A.

Strohlein

11C4S

MIA-PFD

SVN; TF1AE, RT New Jersey, YC487502 5.8k SW of Ta Ko, on 3rd HALO operation

22 Jun 71- Madison Alexander Strohlein, SGT E-5 of Philadelphia, PA, RT NEW JERSEY USASF TF1AE (CCN), Da Nang, Ops 35 MIA. Strohleim was inserted behind enemy lines via parachute (HALO) into the Ta Ko area during a night recon mission with SGM William "Billy" Waugh and SFC James O. Bath who was injured was on the jump. Five hours later he requested medical evacuation then after four more hours he reported enemy activity/movement all around him. A WACO City recovery team was inserted on 23 Jun could not locate SGT Strohlein, however, his weapon, radio, and map was found. Indications are Stroheim was captured, although the North Vietnamese denies any knowledge. Please see: http://www.a101avn.org/SOG.htm which is a letter written by Richard A Bittle, Crew Chief on one of the birds that went in to recover the team and tells of the efforts to find Stroheim, also see "SOG HALO EXTRACTION" in the Tales From SOG.  NOTE: NEWS FLASH Vietnam admitted Strohlein was captured alive see--POW/MIAs abanonded

      Additional Information:  There was NO HATCHET force inserted on Strohlein unless they snuck in on some other form of transport. Over the years I have had three people tell me that they were the one who found Strohlein’s 203, yada yada yada. Horsepockey!  RT habu and Dirty Dick Dougherty were the so called "hatchet force that went in after Strohlein. Lemuel McGlothren and Woody had rappelled into retrieve Tubby Bath, just before that. Dave dougherty and his team and the remainder of RT Habu were loaded up and we went in to try and get Strohlein before the weather closed in. Along with Dave was his 11 , and Guy Wagy, myself and the rest of RT habu. We inserted in the lower edge of the ridgeline that Tubby had been pulled out of.  The ridge climbed steeply up to the South west and we started moving  in a file looking in the trees and listening for any sign of Strohlein. The 11 from Dave 's team was a blond headed kid with a polish name and for the life of me I cant remember it. I found Strohlein’s Car15 with the 203 on the bottom. There was a 40mm He jammed in it and it had fallen  from above in the trees, Dave and I had been doing little sweeps because Covey had been telling us that we were right on top of him. We found where they had drug the chute out of the trees and there were drag marks going up the ridge. I believe we also found a strobe and a map not sure on that.  We started to move up in the direction of the  signs when we could smell US heating tablets burning like someone was cooking. Ti Ti Loi and Thua came up to me, they had been up  further and told me "Beucoup VC and pointed up the ridge. It was getting late and we decided to  move back towards the area we had been inserted. Weather closed in and we were forced to stay  in the area. We got down to where we were going to be extracted from we noted we had  movement from the area that we had just come from. Lots of it with sticks banging and metal on metal. Dave and I moved our teams to the west and slightly up form the extraction LZ looking for better ground if we had to make a fight of it. We found bomb trenches on a little knoll and that is where we  got into position. We put out claymores and waited it out. They did a line search across  the ridge and passed just above and just below us. They must have figured we would never use their bomb trenches, or somebody just screwed up. I remember the trenches because they had Foxfire or illuminecence in the bottoms so you could find them in the dark. it was like sitting in a neon light after it got dark . We were extracted without further problems except as few shots going out. It was our opinion that they had drug Strohlein out of the trees. The tree where we found his  Car and the Map and emergency radio was bullet scarred about fifteen feet up and there was brass at the bottom. It appeared from the signs that they had ripped a burst at him and forced him to drop his weapons, then pulled him and his chute out. The drag marks going uphill were what we  were following when we ran into all the movement. We could never figure out why they left the other equipment. The Car was at the base of the hill, the map about twenty meters further up then the radio and strobe light, like they were laying a trail. We suspected an ambush and when  Thua came back with tti ti Loi, and said there were lots of assholes above us that pretty much  Confirmed it.

      They knew we were still there after dark because they kept beating sticks and  banging on metal as they swept that ridge we were on. They would do that to keep their alignment and sometimes to see if they could spook us. The yards were all freaked out about being in the trenches, because of the luminescence. Most of us lay beside them rather than actually getting in. Pretty smart of the bad guys though , there was a high speed trail about fifty meters north of those bunkers, if they got caught at night they could find shelter in the dark. There were more luminescence marking the trees about head height, like inverted V's. Guy Wagy was the 11 of Daugherty's team, The blonde kid that had a polish name,was a strap hanger. He was a friend of Strohlein. He became quite Ditzy after we found the gun. Not all that uncommon, sort of but for the grace of God that could be me...thinking I guess.
We figured out pretty quick that the equipment was left to draw us uphill into an ambush, it was laid out all too neat, pointing in one direction. Nick
By: Nick Brokhausen

Madison A Strohlem Fr SF Honor Roll

 

1971

06

26

E-8 MSG

Sebastian E.

Deluca

11F5S

DNH, intentional homicide

Laos; OPS 80

26 Jun 71- Sebastion E. Deluca, MSG E-8, SOG, Ops 80, NCOIC-Officially Listed as a Death Non Hostile, There’s more to this incident, which indicates he was Killed in Action for his country and fellow Americans by a hostile force. Deluca’s knowledge regarding missing Americans combined with the bureaucracy decisions prevent effective recovery of the Americans, lead him to take a bold, heroic, but unwise initiative to act on his own that resulted in his death in Laos in an effort to secure the release of some Americans. [Photo featured, page 104-105, Project Omega, Eye of The Beast, by James E. Acre]

 

1971

07

6

O-3 CPT

Donald G.

Carr

31542

MIA-PFD

Laos; TF1AE, MLT3, YB460352, aboard OV-10 # 67-14634, 15k west of Leghorn

06 Jul 71- Daniel W. Thomas, 1LT 0-2, Pilot, Covey, 23rd Tactical Aerial Surveillance Squadron, tail # 634, USAF Ops 32/75 and Donald Gene "Butch" Carr, CPT 0-3 of San Antonio, TX, USASF, Special Mission Advisory Op, Deputy Cmdr MLT-3 (CCN), NKP, MIA-Presumptive finding of death. While performing an orientation flight in an OV-10 aircraft over Laos (15 miles inside Laos west of Ben Het) for newly assigned Cpt Carr made a radio contact reporting they were over their target area but due to adverse weather conditions, could not observe the ground. That was the last radio transmission and have not been heard from since. Search and rescue efforts were made without success.

11 Jul 71- Team Pike Hill, (names unknown), Monkey Mountain FOB, Camp Black Rock, Da Nang, Ops 36, MIA. An all Cambodian soldier team was inserted into "Zone Alpha" in Cambodia and after making a scheduled radio contact on Jul 2nd, the entire team was never heard from again-

11 Jul thru 24 Aug 71- Three Special Commando scouts KIA in the PHU DUNG operational area.

05   5 Aug 71- Cinkosky,  David Edward, Cpt. 03, U.S. Army Aviation, O-1E pilot of the 219th Aviation Co. 4th Plt., CCS, MLS/N of Post Falls, The back seat was a Montanyard One Zero.  (names unknown) TF3AE (CCS), Ban Me Thuot, flying visual Recon over Cambodia came under intense enemy fire and crashed. KIA-RR.  (Added by: Dale Bennett-Snoopy - 3,  .  The crash site is shown in Plaster's  Photo book Page 122. None of the NVA that fired on Dave survived that day. Four 20th SOS Guns expended all of their ordinance on the target ( 40,000 rounds of mini-gun and 56 X 2.75 rockets.) The MIKE FAC then put in 3 sets  of Tac-Air. All structures were completely destroyed and the whole hill was lowered about 2 meters. Both bodies were recovered.   I was the high bird on this mission- DALE R. BENNETT, Snoopy - 3  SOA 910GL)

CinkoskyDE01c.jpgDavid E. Cinkosky, From Vietnam Virtual Wall

 

 

 

1971

08

7

O-2 1LT

Loren D.

Hagen

31542

KIA  Medal of Honor

SVN; TF1AE, RT Kansas, Quang Tri Prov., w/ Bingham & Berg, XD910563 17k NNE of old Lang Vei

1971

08

7

E-6 SSG

Oran L.

Bingham

11B4S

KIA

SVN; TF1AE, RT Kansas, Quang Tri Prov., w/ Hagen & Berg, XD910563 17k NNE of old Lang Vei

1971

08

7

E-5 SGT

Bruce A.

Berg

11C4S

KIA, BNR

SVN; TF1AE, RT Kansas, Quang Tri Prov., w/ Hagen & Bingham, XD910563 17k NNE of old Lang Vei

07 Aug 71- Loren "Festus" D. Hagen, 1Lt 0-2, Medal of Honor Winner and Oran L. Bingham, SGT E-5 and Bruce A. Berg, TF1AE (CCN), RT Kansas performing Recon deep imoh_army-s.gifn enemy held territory KIA-RR In a battle with odds of 107 to 1, RT Kansas of 14 commandos (six Americans and eight SCU) faced a formidable foe of an entire regiment, supported by a second regiment. One NVA regiment was able to overrun the Special Forces’ Kham Duc camp in 1968 and it only took one third of a regiment to completely overrun the Special forces camp at Lang Vei in one night. Here RT Kansas equipped with only what they had on their backs, CAR 15's, grenade launchers and one M-60 machine gun faced an onslaught greater than the men at the Alamo. Clearly, RT Kansas was an unwanted guest and the NVA intended to remove the team without delay. The team had taken up a position on a small hill, spent the night, receiving probing activities during the night, as dawn approached, trucks began to arrive filled with NVA. The onslaught came with a single, well placed RPG round, which smashed into Berg’s bunker exploding, collapsing it. This was the signal for the assault. Lt Hagen went to check Berg but was cut down in the massive enemy fire and died. Bingham left his bunker to reposition the claymores and died within six feet of his position with a bullet striking him in the head. A SCU jumped up and was cut down immediately. SGT Bill Queen lay wounded, SGT Tony Anderson having sustained multiple wound, but fighting and commanding the situation, and SGT William Rimondi unwounded and fighting. The enemy came in great numbers, so close rolling over the hill, they were inches from the end of the CAR 15 muzzles. Then air support arrived with massive fire power which broke the enemy’s attack and the enemy fled for cover. By this time Rimondi was suffered multiple wounds. Hueys arrived and the remaining team members and some of the teams dead were recover. Three hours later, SGT Anderson, although wounded, returned with the bright light team and recovered the dead. Berg’s remains were not located. Three Americans and three SCU died in this action with a confirmed 185 NVA dead, a kill ratio of 31:1. 

Name: Bruce Allan Berg; Rank/Branch: E5/US Army; Unit: USARV Training Operational Group TF1AE TSH NHA; Date of Birth: 22 April 1950Home City of Record: Olympia WA; Date of Loss: 07 August 1971 Country of Loss: South Vietnam; Loss Coordinates: 164700N 1064732E Status (in 1973): Killed/Body Not Recovered; Category: 2Aircraft/Vehicle/Ground: Ground; Other Personnel in Incident: (none missing)

Refno: 1765 REMARKS: Source: Compiled from one or more of the following: raw data from U.S. Government agency sources, correspondence with POW/MIA families, published sources, interviews. Updated by the P.O.W. NETWORK in 1998.

SYNOPSIS: On August 7, 1971, Sgt. Berg was serving in a reconnaissance unit in Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam. That morning, Sgt. Berg and an indigenous soldier left their night defensive position, a bunker, to recover a Claymore mine which had been positioned the night before. The indigenous soldier reported that Sgt. Berg was hit in the head by small arms fire about 6 feet from the bunker. No effort could be made by other U.S. members of the team to recover Sgt. Berg, as the team came under heavy enemy pressure. During the ensuing fire fight, a large amount of friendly infantry ordnance was fired into the vicinity of Sgt. Berg's last known position. The surviving members of the team were later forced to withdraw, leaving behind Sgt. Berg, one other U.S. soldier, and several indigenous soldiers. At an unspecified date, another team went to the location of the incident and recovered the bodies of the other U.S. soldier and the three indigenous bodies, but was not able to locate Sgt. Berg. Berg's condition at the time of withdrawal of the unit is unknown. The initial shot in his head may or may not have been mortal. The artillery fire may or may not have killed him, but if so, may or may not have obliterated any trace of his body. These details may never be known. It is noteworthy that although the recovery team located the bodies of the other dead personnel, they did not find any trace of Berg. It is possible, although remotely so, that he recovered from the shock of his initial wound, left his original position, and survived to be captured. Since the end of the war, several million documents have been reviewed by the U.S. Government and hundreds of thousands of interviews conducted on the subject of Americans missing in Southeast Asia. Many authorities are convinced that hundreds are still alive in captivity. If Sgt. Berg survived, perhaps he is one of them. It's time we brought these men home. NOTE: SEE THE BOOK An Enormous Crime "The Definitive Account of American POWs Abandoned in Southeast Asia by Former U.S. Rep Bill Hendon (R-N.C.) and Elizabeth A. Stewart.

 

Mon Oct 13  1997 Great work... I have additional information regarding Bruce Allen Berg. The combat action in which Berg was lost is described in the last chapter of John L. Plaster's new book SOG: The Secret Wars of America's Commandos in Vietnam (1997 Simon & Schuster).  The day of Berg's loss I heard the story somewhat differently, and I told Plaster that by phone a couple of weeks ago. Surviving witnesses are Staff Sergeant Tony Andersen, USA (he was the one who told Plaster his version of the story), and Sergeant William Ramundi [Rimundi?] who told me his account immediately after returning from the battle in which Berg was lost.  Ramundi has not yet been located for comment. On his previous mission Berg was second in command (One-One) on Recon Team Oklahoma, which I commanded (mixed USASF and Montagnard commandos).  I was not on the mission in which he was lost the following week. Berg's unit TF1AE (Task Force One Advisory Element), was previously known as CCN (Command & Control North) [MACVSOG]. Berg's Aug. 7, 1971 loss was near Khe Sanh.  Berg was a member of Command & Control North (CCN was renamed Task Force One Advisory Element "TF1AE", Training Advisory Group [TAG] in 1971), which was based on the North side of Marble Mountain in Da Nang.  Berg had been second in command of Recon Team Oklahoma on his previous mission, and he was attached to RT Kansas at the time of his loss.  Six US Army Special Forces and eight Montangnards made up RT Kansas for Sergeant Berg's last mission.  Other than Berg, Rimumdi [Ramondi ?], and Anderson, the other USASF team members were Sergeant William (Bill) Queen, Staff Sergeant Oran Bringham, and Lieutenant Loren Hagen.  I do not have the names of the Montangard commandos who survived that combat action. As described in Plaster's book (SOG), although they weren't aware of it at the time, RT Kansas had inadvertently set up their defensive perimeter almost within sight of the Hanoi High Command's most critical new venture, the first 6-inch fuel pipeline laid across the DMZ and down the Cam Lo River valley, absolutely essential in the next few months when entire tank battalions would roll through there for the war's largest offensive.  The NVA 304th Division, plus a regiment of the 308th Division was already massing nearby, in preparation for the offensive. According to Chief SOG Colonel John Sadler, an entire NVA regiment, supported by a second regiment, stormed the hill top position of RT Kansas that day. At a mismatch seven times greater than the Alamo, it was the most one-sided battle of the war. A few hours after that action I was told by Ramondi that Berg was standing inside their perimeter when he was apparently hit in the shoulder, or head, by what he thought was a B-40 rocket or mortar round.  According to Ramondi the blast knocked Berg outside of their perimeter.  Hagan went after him, and never returned.  In Anderson's account (as told by Plaster) he states that Berg was inside a bunker which was hit with an RPG, and that Hagan was killed while attempting to reach Berg's position.  In your posted biographical sketch of Berg you describe how an "indigenous soldier reported that Sgt. Berg was hit in the head by small arms fire about six feet from the bunker." Immediately after Berg was hit by the initial volley (whether by an RPG, or mortar round, or whatever) of enemy fire on the teams position, Hagan apparently made a valiant attempt to reach Berg.  Hagan received the CMH posthumously for his unsuccessful effort.  Although Hagan's body was recovered later that day, Bruce Berg was never found.  He was declared Killed/Body Not Recovered (in 1973 ?).

I think we've all noticed, through the years, that true heroes seldom speak of their gallantry.  When they do it's usually with humble reluctance, and only then shared with those closest to them who care enough to listen and learn.  

This is a recent photo of my friend Bill Rimondi.  We went through SF training group together and were on the same team in commo field training.  We got together again later in 1971 at CCN / TF1AE, when he was assigned to RT Oklahoma.  After he completed recon team leader's school Rimondi ran his first combat mission in the A Shau with RT Kansas (Hagan, Berg, Bingham, Queen, [Anthony?], and Montangnard team members).  Information by: Dr. Bruce Rusty Lang, Project 404, Laos, 1970, CCN, MACVSOG, 1971 - 2526 West Tenth Street, Dallas, Texas, USA 75211-1652; Tel: 214-467-5263; Email: rustylang@aol.com

Pastor Bill Rimondi at Liberty Center Bible College

Family information request re. Oran Bingham [CCN, RT Kansas KIA 8/7/71]
FM: Sean Williams <swilliams@slco.org>

I am looking for anyone with more information about SSG Oran L. Bingham, a member of RT Kansas, TF1AE (CCN), KIA 07Aug71. He along With 1LT Loren Hagen and SGT Bruce Berg were killed that day 17km NNE of old Lang Vei (coord. 164700N.1064732E) Surviving members of his team were SGT William (Bill) Queen, SGT Tony Anderson and SGT William Rimondi but I haven't been able to find any information about any of these men. If anyone out there knows how to contact or has any information on the whereabouts for these men please contact me. SSG Oran Bingham was my wife's father and she wants to know more about him. He was killed when she was 6 months old and he never knew that he was a father. Her mother refuses to give up any information about him so any info I could get from this forum would really be appreciated. Or if anyone out there knew him form other units (he was a 11B4S) or AT ALL please write. Thanks.
 

1971

08

13

E-5 SGT

Mark H.

Eaton

11B4S

KIA

SVN; TF1AE, RT North Carolina, Quang Nam Prov., YC465505 7k WSW of Ta Ko

13 Aug 71- Mark H. Eaton, SGT E-5, USASF, Recon, TFlAE (CCN)-KIA

A Note from The Virtual Wall

Staff Sergeant Eaton was assigned to the Psychological Warfare Section, TF-1AE, Command & Control North, at the time of his death. By report, he was killed in action with Recon Team "North Carolina" about 7km west-southwest of Ta Ko.

? Aug 71- ARVN Tm/Asst Tm Ldrs and Five Special Commando Scouts (Names and ranks unknown) MIA

? Aug 71 - Five Special Commando scouts KIA and one Scout MIA (names unknown) performing Spike Team duties in the Demilitarized Zone.

1971

09

14

E-8 MSG

Don R.

Gilbreth

11F5S

KIA

SVN; TF1AE, Quang Nam Prov., BT065697, 3.4k S of C-1, hit road mine, w/ CPT Roesch

1971

09

14

O-3 CPT

Heinz K.

Roesch

31542

KIA

SVN; TF2AE, Quang Nam Prov., BT065697, 3.4k S of C-1, hit road mine, w/ MSG Gilbreth

14 Sep 71- Heinz K. Roesch, CPT 0-3 and Don R. Gilbreth, MSG E-8, TF1AE (CCN), Da Nang, Ops 35 Killed while riding a jeep which hit a mine outside the compound KIA-RR

RoeschHK01c.jpgHeinz K. Roesch

? Oct 71- Two Special Commando Scouts (Names unknown) KIA in base area 702

 

1971

10

11

E-7 SFC

Audley D.

Mills

11F4C

KIA

SVN; TF1AE, Quang Nam Prov., BT076712 1.5k SE of C-1; while disarming a booby trap

11 Oct 71- Audley "Audie" D. Mills, SFC E-7, USASF, TFlAE (CCN), Da Nang, Ops 35 KIA-RR He was killed when his six man recon team made contact with an enemy force while performing Recon in South Vietnam. He called for assistance and a "Prairie Fire" emergency, but before being extracted, he was killed. SOG’s final death due to ground operations. (Note: I met Audie when he got in country and  was in the TOC, I was put in the TOC Aug 70 pending a commission at the end of Aug 70, a very likeable guy and someone I considered a friend, he is missed-RL Noe)

? Oct 71- Two Special Commando Scouts (names unknown) MIA.

? Oct 71- Five Special Commando Scouts (names unknown) KIA

1971

10

29

E-7 SFC

Gene W.

Stockman

71L4S

DNH, accidental homicide

SVN; TF1AE, Quang Nam Prov., accidental shooting in the old CCN barracks

29 29 Oct 71- Gene W. Stockman, SFC E-7, USASF, TF1AF (CCN), Died  Gene was not killed as a result of a vehicle accident, he was killed in an accidental shooting with my .25 cal browning pocket pistol.  I was on leave at the time and Gene had asked me to let him keep my pistol safe while I was gone. He went drinking somewhere one night and was shot in the gut, right through the artery that splits and becomes the femoral arteries in the legs.  I was a SSG at the time, working in the S4 shop and had the privilege of supporting these very brave soldiers. At the time, MG Bowra was a 2LT and MG Bargewell was a SSG, Recon Company with CPT Manes and the irrepressible SGM Billy Waugh.  By: Richard Whitmanh

 
30 Oct 71 -Robert E Ryan, 1LT, FAC Pilot, 20th TASS, KIA RR. On 30 Oct 71, LT Ryan took off from Nakom Phanom Royal Thai Air Force Base at 0020 hrs local Thailand time with SSG Robert T Aston of TFIAE (Covey Rider). Their mission was a visual reconnaissance over Laos. While returning , he crashed near Savannakhet, Laos. SSG Ashton was critically injured with multiple broken bones, internal injuries and possible head injuries.  At 0521hrs Lt Ryan advised moonbeam, the Airborne Command Post, that one of his engines was out and the other was running rough.  At 0525hrs he advised Moonbeam that his other engine had quit and that it appeared that he was going to land short of the runway. He was wearing a parachute, however, by the time he realized that he would not make it to the runway, he had descended below the minimum altitude for bailout. The aircraft crashed approximately 0530hrs one mile short of the runway. It was determined Lt Ryan died instantly as a result of the crash. We have no way of knowing whether the aircraft was shot down by hostile fire or not. However, it is believed to be the case as he was flying over an extremely hostile area. SSG Ashton did not recall any details of the crash and he was at the Medical Holding Detachment as of 22 November 1971. (MEMO: After the aircraft was recovered, it was determined the fuel tanks had been hit with small arms, resulting in fuel loss) Source: DFC Citation and letters from Commander 20TASS submitted by Major Mike Linnane, US Army Special Forces, Mike is the brother-in-law of Lt Ryan. Major Linnane fought during the attack on Ben Het and was the recipient of the Bronze Star w/V device.

? Nov 71- Special Commando Scout (Name unknown) MIA after a fire fight with the enemy

? Nov 7- Earth Angel Team Members (Name and Number unknown) failed to return after being trapped in an enemy ambush MIA-Bodies not recovered

? Dec 71- Pilot, 0-1G aircraft and Photographer (Names unknown) MACSOG 20, Intel Div, Flying a photo recon mission the aircraft was shot down. KIA-RR. I know that this was a Marine Master Gunnery Sergeant (Photographer/Intelligence Specialist) and an Air Force Captain (pilot).  The plane went down in Cambodia, when the pilot was killed at extremely low altitude and the aircraft could not recover.  I knew the Master Gunnery Sergeant, he was with me at MACVSOG on Louis Pasteur Street in Saigon, but one of my Vietnam problems is the inability to remember many names. Don Williams, MACVSOG, SOA 2478

12 12 Dec 71- Benard J. Moran, Jr., MSG E-8, US Marine Corps, SOG, Ops 20, NCOIC-KIA.  I served with BJ in OP-20 and had the pleasure of pinning his E-8 stripes on him.  BJ was the only Marine serving specifically with SOG who was KIA’ed and we’re very proud of him. He would like to be remembered as the kind of Marine he was-Outstanding.  The mission he was on was strictly volunteer basis and he wasn’t required to be where he was when KIA’ed.  Major Ralph Sturgeon, USMC. --- My Name is MSgt Allwerdt USMC where I serve as an Imagery Analyst, I  am trying to find out any information concerning MSgt Bernard Moran. He was a Marine 0241 (Imagery Analyst) who was assigned/served with MACV-SOG and was killed in action 12 Dec 1971.  MSgt Moran is the  only 0241 KIA but there is little information on his service.  I am hoping to gather information so that the Marine Imagery community can know about his sacrifice and better honor his memory.  Not to mention that there were few Marines let alone intelligence Marines who served with MACV-SOG.  Thank you for you assistance in this matter. Respectfully, Karl M. Allwerdt
MSgt USMC  allwerdt@mac.com

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